It’s time for a fresh perspective on the subject of online hate. Who are these people? Why do they do it? How does it feel to be on the receiving end? And moreover, what can we do to change their ways? First, let’s start with this: picture an online troll. What do you see? A lonely person sat alone in the dark, their laptop screen casting a sad white light across their bitter face as they aggressively type “YOU UGLY FAT BITCH” under the photo of someone they’ve never even met?

It Could Be Anyone

Whilst this may be true for some ‘keyboard warriors’/’online trolls’/’haters’, it is also a hyperbolised image that has been popularised to make their victims feel somewhat better about the hate they are facing. The fact of the matter is that not all haters are lonely people sat in their bedroom, with Dorito crumbs jumping around their keyboard as they slam their fingers into its letters. More likely, it is that girl you stood behind in the queue for your coffee this morning, that boy running on the treadmill next to you, the friend you went clubbing with last weekend. It sounds scary but think about it – there are truly too many negative comments floating out there on the online sphere for them all to be coming from a few select dark and lonely bedrooms.

The Rise of Trolls

Unfortunately, social media has made it even easier for us to quantify not only our beauty, but our popularity – both of which can be a root of jealousy. Whilst we’re protected by our glass screens, it’s easier to direct that hate towards the subject of your jealousy. This can be in the form of of hate comments, fake accounts, mean DMs etc. and this is showing no sign of stopping.

Picture This…

Let’s switch this around quickly. Imagine you just posted a photo on Instagram, you liked it, felt good wearing that outfit and sent it to three of your closest friends for approval before you posted it. You came up with the perfect edit and caption. You post it and continue with your day. Later, when you go to check the comments, one in particular catches your eye; “KILL YOURSELF”. Stunned, you go to click on their profile, the words ‘follow back’ appear at the top of your screen, coupled with a blank profile picture and a bio in a language you don’t understand. You press block, you go back and delete the comment and lock your phone. You sit there and reassure yourself that it’s just a weirdo sat alone in their dark room; insecure, angry and bored. You get up and continue with your day, a vague voice in the back of your head questioning what about that photo had offended someone so much that they went out of their way to wish you would end your life. The answer never comes.

It’s Time For Some Perspective

To all the people out there leaving negative comments under a person’s photo, please imagine the above scenario next time you do and realise that it is so much easier and faster to simply scroll across a photo of someone you don’t like, rather than type out a toxic message in the hopes that they’ll read it. If something someone does offends you, or draws out your insecurities, unfollow them regardless of who they are – your best friend or that insta model with the perfect life. YOU are choosing to expose yourself to them, and it’s up to YOU  to remove that source of anger from your life before you turn into that person creating fake accounts designed to make them feel the same anger you do. Two angry people is in no way better than one or even none. The world has enough upset in it without you adding to it.

Advice For The Victims

Learn to make the block button your favourite friend. Do not reply them as you’ll be showing that they’ve made enough of an impact on you to pick up your phone and waste your own energy on them. Do not name and shame them publicly by screenshotting their comment and sharing it to your public profile. This won’t stop them creating a new fake account and giving them more of a reason to hate you. Just block them as soon as you see their comment – without giving them any of the attention they so clearly need.

Karma is a Bitch

Finally, please also understand that with every ounce of hate you project out into the universe, it will come back to you tenfold and honestly, can you afford that when you can’t even afford to put the lights on in your room? Doubt it.


So what did you think? Have you ever faced online hate, or are you a hater without even realising it? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below and make sure to subscribe to get all my blog posts direct to your email!




Clickbait; a concept where an attention-grabbing headline or cover image is used to deceivingly hook a reader/viewer into clicking a post, only for them to find that it has nothing even remotely to do with what they expected.


Where Did It Come From?


This concept has grown widely from the usual hyperbolic headlines of tabloids and permeated the online sphere (as most trends do). It grew in popularity on YouTube, where creators would title videos things such as “My Uber Driver Kidnapped Me!”, where in actual fact, their Uber driver simply took a wrong turn and had to re-route. This phenomenon has also wiggled its way onto Instagram. Here, videos are displayed with a still shot taken from the video as its cover. Several people take advantage of this by using including a random one second scene in their video that they use as a cover.


Enough Is Enough!


We’re tired of it. It has been one too many videos that have been excitedly clicked on only to realise that it was just another boring video of a something we’ve seen one hundred times over. We’re tired of fake injections, we’re tired of knife contour and we’re tired of the wagging finger that appears after every random item is brought out in the video (whose sole purpose was to act as clickbait, not a new and innovative way to slice apples or apply contour).

What once was an admittedly smart and effective way to boost your views has now cheapened the quality of videos on social media and can even directly damage your brand if used too heavily. Who wants to come across as overly dramatic, insincere and possibly even a liar?

At the end of the day, if it’s too good to be true, don’t give it a view.



P.S. Sorry for the clickbait title.



What about you, are you tired of clickbait?

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There aren’t many things I’d like for Christmas this year, but here are my top requests:

  1. 500 new followers on Instagram (all of whom come with a 10-minute guaranteed like per uploaded photo).
  2. A celebrity shout-out on Twitter (must have a verified account and over 100k followers).
  3. A custom Snapchat filter, designed to make me look perfect from all angles – even that awkward under-chin angle that appears when you open Snapchat.
  4. A 200-character limit on Twitter (so I can #humblebrag about all my presents without subtweeting myself like last year).
  5. Oh, maybe world peace and all that kind of stuff too if you have time (if not, don’t worry – I don’t want to seem spoilt!).



Please and thank you,


A. Basicbitch


P.S. If this could all arrive on the 24th, ready for me to use on Christmas day (peak opportunity for festive social media posting), that would be ideal!





Anything else to add? Post your top Christmas requests in the comments and don’t forget to like, subscribe and share!



What is it?

Now this is an issue that needs to be addressed head-on (directly, if you will). For those of you who don’t know, indirects are when someone talks about someone else on social media without actually mentioning their name. They usually come in the form of status updates and/or captions on social media. These can be obviously both positive and negative and sometimes ambiguous. The most common form of indirect seems to be in the form of random Drake lyrics (“Where you movin’? I said onto better things”), usually teamed with a blurry photo of someone sitting alone in a club with what looks like a bottle of champagne (but is probably a $10 bargain bucket bottle of bucks fizz from Tesco).

So, why do people do it?

There’s a great possibility that the subject of your matter may not even see the tweet/status/caption that you so devotedly crafted for them, or worse – see it and not even know it was aimed at them. On top of that, you run the risk of someone else wrongly believing it to be about them. All outcomes tend to end up with you looking rather petty and childish.

Let’s make a change.

It’s important these days to kill the tribe of keyboard warriors that seem to be swarming all over the internet. Don’t be someone who hides behind 140 characters and denies any connection to the targeted person when confronted about it. Everyone can read and everyone can contextualize.

Best Practices

Next time you find yourself having an issue in your life, try to take a step away from your phone/laptop and breathe. What good will a passive aggressive tweet do? It won’t solve the problem and has all the potential to make it even worse – especially if you get called out for it online and all of a sudden you find yourself wrapped up in the giant frenzy of a “Twitter War”. It’s not a good look and it won’t make the problem go away. Instead, remind yourself to choose your battles. If it’s something that can be addressed over social media, it probably isn’t worth your time (and phone battery) “dealing” with it.





What did you think? Have you ever been the perpetrator or victim to an indirect post? Share your comments below and make sure to subscribe to get the latest blog posts straight to your email!



Let’s Set the Scene.

Take a look at the photos you uploaded from your last night out. No doubt they’re a blurry series of bottle girls with sparklers, selfies with random people from the table next to you, a snapshot of what seems to be your friend’s reaction to the funniest joke ever told, someone standing on the table at some point and maybe a botched video of a synchronised dance.

Now, Take Another Look

Now take another look. Those bottle girls weren’t headed towards your table, those random people had no idea you were in a selfie with them, and the photo of your friends laughing was meticulously chosen out of 45 different shots and an hour-long discussion over WhatsApp. That person standing on the table? They climbed up there themselves and yelled at you to take a photo of them until it looked “believably candid” (it didn’t). And that dance? You and your friends watched a quick YouTube tutorial before you left and mastered the basic moves.

The Cooler Something is, The Less Time You Have to Get Out Your Camera

Think about that night. Was it really that fun? Did you remember it though your own eyes, or through a Snapchat filter?

Next time you go out, be truly spontaneous. Our generation is obsessed with doin’ it for the ‘gram, so maybe try and do cool things without feeling the need to replicate it as soon as it happens in order to catch it on camera (“Wait wait wait, do that again! My Snapchat was still loading!”). It’s time to realise that the cooler something is, the less time you have to get out your camera.



It’s Time.

Forget juice cleanses, this is the new detox to hit us at full speed – and we need it desperately. Whilst it’s important to look after our bodies, we need to ensure that our minds too, stay free of general nastiness.

False Advertising at it’s Finest

According to DoSomething.org, 70% of girls believe they don’t “measure up” or aren’t “good enough” in some way – this includes physical appearance, school performance and relationships. What’s the source of these standards that girls feel the need to compare themselves to? You guessed it: social media.

What Are We Going To Do About it

So, take a break; turn off your phone, deactivate your Facebook/Twitter/Tumblr (temporarily, of course – you will eventually need contact with the outside world in order to find out exactly what Kylie wore to that red carpet event) and enjoy the world in front of you. Appreciate the un-edited wrinkles in the face of your best friend, laugh at jokes that are said in over 140 characters and see the world through rose-coloured lenses, not a rose-coloured filter.

Start Small

It can be that simple. Try it – and if a full detox scares you, start small. Go for an hour and build your way up. Think it’s not possible? Remind yourself of this: you managed up until around 7 years ago without social media, so you can probably handle 7 days (or minutes, no judgement) without it now. Go for it.





What did you think? Is a #DigitalDetox the way forward? Like, comment and subscribe to keep up to date with the blog!


You Know the Drill.

Direct message, inbox, PM – whatever you call it, that creepy guy found it. You know the guy: the one with no profile picture, a username like @usher23940_1 and collection of retweets in a foreign language filling his timeline – with the odd blurry selfie thrown in for good measure. You don’t want him in your DMs. You don’t know how he found you and what you posted that gave him the signal that you may indeed want him to enter your DMs, but he did it.

Knight in Shining Pixels

In some way, you have to admire the confidence of these guys; they craft a personalised message just for you and bravely press send – their heart on the line – with no assurance that you will even read his greeting/compliment/poem (yes, poem). Surely the sheer bravery of this act should be rewarded? The gallant, unabashed initiation of courting you? No? Didn’t think so.

If They Weren’t There You’d Notice

The majority of direct messages go unanswered, so surely this should correlate with the number of broken hearts per day, right? No! The very nature of social media makes it even easier to talk to several people at once, meaning that the beautifully written poem that you received this morning was possibly sent to 11 other people (sorry). As a generation, we are becoming immune to both compliments as well as rejection. One girl doesn’t answer you? Don’t worry, because the next one is only a scroll away. Equally, how would you feel if you posted a photo and no random guys slid into your DMs with a handful of compliments and heart-eyed emojis? Relieved? Probably. But surely a little, niggling part of your brain would be thinking something along the lines of “Maybe the Amaro filter wasn’t working. I’ll try Crema next time and see what happens”. We can’t help it. We have become accustomed to being complimented day-in and day-out; so whilst we may complain about the creeps in our DMs, if they weren’t there, you’d notice.




So what do you think – does #ItGoDownInTheDMs? Like, comment and subscribe to keep up to date with the blog!




Less Than a Goldfish.

Let’s keep this article short. Maybe not 140 characters short, but you can do this.

Studies have shown that our attention span as a generation is falling to 8 seconds – which is less than that of a goldfish (9 seconds). We opt for screen-based activities, rather than conventional reading. You only need to look as far as your phone for proof of this. Viral videos began on YouTube – averaging at 4 minutes and 12 seconds. Then Vine was born, reducing it down to 6 second clips and nowadays with the rise of GIFs, we’re just about managing 1-2 seconds of attention per media.

Still Reading?

Take a minute (if you can manage that) to look at your own behaviour. Did you drift off whilst reading this article? Pick up your phone to check your notifications? If so, try and practice concentrating on one task at once. In a world where multi-tasking is expected of us, it’s hard to simply focus on the task at hand, so start small. BUT, if you made it through this post in one sitting, then congratulations, you can successfully read 936 characters (that’s nearly seven tweets)!



Let me know if you made it through the post and what you thought!


If you want to test your attention span, try this: http://psychologytoday.tests.psychtests.com/take_test.php?idRegTest=3361


You start getting ready for a night out, leaving an extra twenty minutes to spare, set aside for the most important part of your night out: taking selfies. It all begins with primer (you don’t know what it does but everyone on YouTube uses it) and reconstruct your face from the bottom-up. Foundation (flawless skin = less editing required), eyebrows (“Maybe if they’re bushy enough, people will ask if I’m related to Cara Delevingne!”), liquid eyeliner (so you can use the hashtag, #WingOnFleek), lipstick (“No this is my natural lip colour”) with a heavy dosage of lip liner (not conforming to the rule, ‘Don’t Colour Outside The Lines’) and 700 pairs of false eyelashes (from h&m, but you tag @HudaBeauty).

Next step? Hair. Centre parting, straight and tucked away neatly behind your ears so you can begin your chest contour. After enlisting the help of both your sisters (and your neighbour), you manage to get your bodycon dress on, only smudging one of your boobs (#success).

Finally, the time has come. The golden twenty minutes you’ve been preparing yourself for over the last five hours. You scour the whole house for the best lighting, running like a one-legged donkey down the stairs in your strappy, open-toe, death contraptions. At last! You’ve found the perfect place. That cute little nook just under your kitchen sink, where you can point the lamp you brought down from your bedroom directly at your face to get the full-on effect of all your gloriousness. Brushing a sponge out of the background of your shot, you begin your process. You know your angles and you know your poses.

14 minutes later you emerge, your phone nearly dead and with no extra storage space. But it was worth it. You present your accomplishments to your sister, ready to start whittling down your top ten to send to your friends to determine the best, most Instagrammable photo. But instead, your sister takes a step away from you, wrinkling her nose, “You smell like bleach, go and have a shower”



So what is it that has made this trend spiral so quickly out of control? Selfies used to be the source of ridicule for its proprietors, but now even the most anti-selfie person will have at least one hidden away in the depths of their Facebook photo albums (most likely, a grainy webcam quality type, with an Apple salesman passing by in the background). When did it become cool to openly admit to the participating in the epitomic act of narcissism? The notion that one applies makeup in such a way to alter their facial structure and will happily journey around their house in search of the best lighting is alien to older generations, but to millennials; simply a way of life.

So what do you think? Should we embrace this form of social narcissism, or try and change our ways before it becomes too late?


Share your opinions below!


Because who needs friends when you have followers, right?

We as a generation are obsessed with that little number underneath our name every time we log into the likes of Twitter and Instagram. Do we see it as a measure of our popularity? Because surely if that was the case, we’d be avidly watching our friend count on Facebook, sending out random invitations and liking the cover photos of people we don’t know. But we don’t. So what does that say about us? Essentially we have come to value the appraisal of people who only know us over the internet, more than people who actually know us the old-school, face to face type of way.

Followers ≠ Friends

It’s hard not to be a victim (or perpetrator, depending on how you look at it) of this issue. Social media has found a way to quantify how much people like “you” and have made this information public to the world. Be honest, imagine the last time you met someone and found out afterwards that they had a huge online following, did you find yourself comparing their follower count to yours? Those extra few pixels on a screen can damage self-esteem within a matter of seconds – not only that, but they can change your perception of people. Would you see someone with 1 million followers the same way you’d treat someone with 57? Probably not, because social media is giving you the message that they are inherently more liked than you, therefore superior – as proven by those damned little pixels.

Sad, right? Now let’s get back to boosting our followers.



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